Cam's Camera Shots: Blog http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog en-us (C) Cam's Camera Shots cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) Thu, 16 Nov 2017 19:17:00 GMT Thu, 16 Nov 2017 19:17:00 GMT http://www.camscamerashots.com/img/s/v-5/u607529749-o1046709647-50.jpg Cam's Camera Shots: Blog http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog 85 120 The Audubon Sanctuary: Safety in the Sanctuary http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/11/the-audubon-sanctuary-safety-in-the-sanctuary <Click all photos to enlarge.
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Nov 16 - 1Praying mantis egg sack It's been a while since I walked in the sanctuary, for two big reasons.  The first is that my left knee was swelling on a regular basis, but I am happy to report that there has been much improvement since I eliminated inflammation-causing foods from my diet (sugar, dairy, and gluten were the main culprits) and I have started taking supplements like collagen, chondroitin, flax and borage oils, and turmeric.  The improvement in both the knee and the weather warranted a long walk today in the sanctuary.

Nov 16 - 2Sycamore jewelry! The second big reason is that on November 4, one of my friends was injured in the sanctuary.  She tripped on uneven ground and fell hard, breaking both bones in her left forearm and fracturing a bone in her right ankle.  Luckily, she was not alone, and after calling 911, her friend was able to meet rescuers at the gate and lead them to where she was.  The ambulance was too big to fit down the old farm lane, so a pickup truck was called for to get her out. 

Nov 16 - 3Magenta berries My friend's accident made me think long and hard about all of the walking that I do by myself in somewhat isolated areas.  It has taken me a few weeks to gain some perspective, so today while the weather was nice, I prepped myself for a safety walk, and while I was walking, thoughts of how I would approach this blog entry ran through my head.  I have come up with some things to consider when walking alone in areas like sanctuaries, state parks, and wildlife refuges.  These are in no particular order of importance.

1) Wear sturdy footwear.  Hiking boots provide even better ankle support if you should step on a walnut or into a depression covered with leaves.

2) Wear a high visibility vest.  It makes you easier to spot, and this time of year, various hunting is going on in rural areas, and although it is prohibited in places like state parks and sanctuaries, not everyone obeys the rules.

3) Take a fully charged cell phone with you.  Include "in case of emergency" information in the contacts of the phone, or carry that information on a card in your pocket, especially if your phone is locked and needs a passcode.  If cell service is an issue, carry a whistle, too.  It will help rescuers to locate you.  

4) Know where you are.  This may sound obvious, but if you are unaware of which trail you are on, or are not aware of landmarks like a stream or a pavilion, it may be difficult to tell rescuers where to find you.  If there is a map of the location, study it before embarking on your walk, so you can tell rescuers you are on the red trail, or in Area B, or whatever references may be on a map.  Also, let rescuers know if a pickup truck or an ATV may be needed to find you in a difficult-to-access area, so that time is not wasted.

5) Last but not least, text someone to let them know you are going alone on a hike or walk at the sanctuary, and text them again when you are home.  At least someone will know your last whereabouts if you are missing and no one knows where to find you.  As a side note, because I am single and live alone, my friend Norma and I have traded emergency contact information with each other.  Now I can call her daughter if there is an emergency, and she can call mine.  

Nov 16 - 4Floating on air

I love our sanctuaries, and I do not want to let fear of having an accident keep me from going.  I will try to find a walking partner when I want to go in more remote areas, like alongside streams, but when I'm by myself, I will stick to the mowed pathways.  I'm also happy to report that after surgery to realign the bones in her arm and an orthopedic boot to help heal her ankle fracture, my friend is on the mend.  She has even been cleared for air travel, to visit her daughter for Thanksgiving.

In a time when we are so reliant on our cell phones to make immediate connections to the outside world, it pays to consider one's safety when walking alone in isolated locations that may have spotty service or none at all.  Be prepared, and be aware.  I know that from now on, I will err on the side of caution, so that I am able to return to the sanctuary for another walk on another day.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries in Central Maryland:  Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD, and Audrey Carroll in Mt. Airy.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Volunteers are always needed to help with sanctuary management.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/11/the-audubon-sanctuary-safety-in-the-sanctuary Thu, 16 Nov 2017 19:17:26 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: Why Do I Go? http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/10/the-audubon-sanctuary-why-do-i-go <Click all photos to enlarge.
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Oct 6 - 1Oct 6 - 1 Oct 6 - 2Oct 6 - 2 People ask me why I go to the Audubon sanctuaries so often, and how I can find new things to photograph each time.  Why I go is probably the easiest to answer.  I go because I need the exercise, I like being out in nature with my camera, and the sanctuaries are close to home.  I'm not so sure I would drive an hour just to walk in a particular sanctuary, but both of these places are nearby, they are protected and maintained, and they are a great resource for Frederick County.

Oct 6 - 3Oct 6 - 3 Oct 6 - 4Oct 6 - 4 How do I find new things to photograph?  The change of seasons helps a lot.  Right now, seeds and berries are plentiful, leaves are changing color, and a variety of birds are migrating through the area.  In the winter there will be bare trees, frosty surfaces, and animal tracks in the snow.  The seasons also bring a variety of insects that are plentiful in summer, but not so much in fall.

Sometimes, I shoot with only my macro lens; or I use only my point and shoot.  Other times, I carry a really big lens (like today) and l challenge myself to use it close up as well as far away.  I look up, down, and all around.  

Oct 6 - 5Oct 6 - 5 Oct 6 - 6Oct 6 - 6 Finally, where I walk is a sanctuary not only for plants and animals, but for humans, as well.  Other than the sounds of birds and chipmunks and occasionally overhead flights of planes and geese, I am usually alone with nature.  The distractions and distressing news of the modern world are left behind.  As I walk, I am usually thinking about how to write this blog; I'm not stressing over things over which I have no control.  It's an hour of peace, which many of us need in today's world.

Oct 6 - 7Oct 6 - 7 Oct 6 - 8Oct 6 - 8 Come walk in the sanctuary with me.  We don't have to say a word...

To raise funds for hurricane relief, please consider purchasing a butterfly print from my Wings of Hope collection.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries in Central Maryland:  Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD, and Audrey Carroll in Mt. Airy.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Volunteers are always needed to help with sanctuary management.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/10/the-audubon-sanctuary-why-do-i-go Fri, 06 Oct 2017 15:59:29 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuaries: Macro Practice http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/10/the-audubon-sanctuaries-macro-practice <Click all photos to enlarge.
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Oct 3 - 1Oct 3 - 1 I'm in the planning stages of a macro photography class and workshop, so today I walked at Audrey Carroll in search of berries, insects, small flowers, webs, and fluffy seeds so that I could practice my focus and my composition.

Oct 3 - 2Oct 3 - 2 Macro photography can be tricky because of the extremely small depth of field.  You may be aiming to have the head of the bug very sharp, but you move, the bug moves, and the plant moves.  They can all conspire against sharp images.  Nevertheless, I practiced with my 100mm Tokina lens, and I found plenty of subject matter.  I'm showing you the sharpest, most successful shots.  There are many unsuccessful ones on my memory card!

Oct 3 - 3Oct 3 - 3 Closeup photography can also be achieved with a small point-and-shoot camera; no really expensive cameras and lenses are needed.  Steady hands, good lighting, and lots of practice shots will yield good results.

If you are interested in learning more about macro photography, consider taking my class at Frederick Community College on Saturday, October 21.  Here is a link to register:  Register

Oct 3 - 4Oct 3 - 4 Oct 3 - 5Oct 3 - 5 Oct 3 - 6Oct 3 - 6 Oct 3 - 7Oct 3 - 7 Oct 3 - 9Oct 3 - 9 Oct 3 - 8Oct 3 - 8 To raise funds for hurricane relief, please consider purchasing a butterfly print from my Wings of Hope collection.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries in Central Maryland:  Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD, and Audrey Carroll in Mt. Airy.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Please do not bring pets into the sanctuary.  Volunteers are always needed to help with sanctuary management.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/10/the-audubon-sanctuaries-macro-practice Tue, 03 Oct 2017 22:09:01 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuaries: Last Day of September http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-last-day-of-september <Click all photos to enlarge.
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Sept 30 - 6Sept 30 - 6 Sept 30 - 5Sept 30 - 5 On this last day of September, I walked the Fred Archibald Sanctuary hoping to see some migrating monarchs, but it was chilly and windy, and the butterflies were not to be found.  If they were hunkering down somewhere, I did not find them.

Sept 30 - 4Sept 30 - 4 Sept 30 - 3Sept 30 - 3 Goldenrod is still in full bloom in the sanctuary, and the paths have recently been mowed, making walking there much easier.  Thank you to volunteers who do this work; it is much appreciated!  Other flowers still blooming are fleabane and some wild aster.

Sept 30 - 2Sept 30 - 2 Sept 30 - 1Sept 30 - 1 Milkweed pods are exploding with their wispy seeds, looking like great puffs of cotton.  Yellow leaves rain down from trees up above, and tall grasses are going to seed, waving their fluffy fronds in the breeze.  A few insects are still feeding on the plant life, and birds are beginning to work on the berries.

This beautiful fall weather just beckons one to go outside; consider a walk in one of the sanctuaries.  

To raise funds for hurricane relief, please consider purchasing a butterfly print from my Wings of Hope collection.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries in Central Maryland:  Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD, and Audrey Carroll in Mt. Airy.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Volunteers are always needed to help with sanctuary management.  Please, do not bring dogs into either sanctuary and obey the posted rules. Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-last-day-of-september Sat, 30 Sep 2017 20:09:43 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuaries: Yellow, Yellow, Everywhere! http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-yellow-yellow-everywhere <Click all photos to enlarge.
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Sept 24 - 1Tickseed or false sunflower? Sept 24 - 2If goldenrod makes you sneeze, don't come here! If September were in a coloring book, the page for the Frederick County Audubon sanctuaries would need many yellow crayons.  Too bad Crayola just retired "dandelion" and replaced it with a new blue, because yellow is the color most predominant right now.  The fields at both sanctuaries are filled with goldenrod, and at Audrey Carroll, spikes of small yellow flowers poke their stalks above, seeking attention.  

Sept 24 - 3Summer has taken its toll on this butterfly. Sept 24 - 3Monarch on pastels The yellow flowers might be tickseed or "false" sunflowers, or perhaps they are Helianthus.  Whatever they are, they are pretty, and on some country lanes, they are in such abundance that people stop to take photos.  

Sept 24 - 4Purple thistle stands out against a sea of yellow. Sept 24 - 5A monarch feeds on goldenrod. Right now, monarch butterflies are taking advantage of the last of the purple thistle and the abundant yellow flowers to fill up on nectar, preparing for their long journey to Mexico.

 

 

Sept 24 - 6This is a male. See the scent "pouches" on the lower wings near the tail? Sept 24 - 7Sept 24 - 7A painted lady head on. At the Audrey Carroll sanctuary today, I was looking for any recently tagged monarchs.  I found plenty of monarchs, but none with tags.  Perhaps the tagged ones knew they were ready to begin migration and have left; perhaps the monarchs I saw today are newly emerged from their chrysalises and they are preparing for their flight.  Regardless, I got a good walk and lots of great butterfly images today at the sanctuary.  I hope you're not tiring of them!

Last but not least, a few more.  Enjoy!

Sept 24 - 8Black swallowtail and friends

Sept 24 - 9Yellow flowers, yellow background, male monarch

Sept 24 - 10Painted Lady on goldenrod

 

To raise funds for hurricane relief, please consider purchasing a butterfly print from my Wings of Hope collection.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries in Central Maryland:  Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD, and Audrey Carroll in Mt. Airy.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Volunteers are always needed to help with sanctuary management.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-yellow-yellow-everywhere Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:13:04 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuaries: First Day of Fall http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-first-day-of-fall <Click all photos to enlarge.>

Happy Fall!  My favorite season is here, so I walked the Fred Archibald sanctuary this morning to check on its progress.  The grasses are super tall in the front part of the sanctuary, obscuring the goldenrod, but in the rear section, it is in full view.

A few butterflies were working the last of the purple thistle.  Leaves are starting to turn color, and berries are getting red.  Enjoy my photos from today, and don't forget to visit and support your local sanctuaries!

Sept 21 - 1Sept 21 - 1

A few monarchs were busy on the thistle.

Sept 21 - 2Sept 21 - 2 Sept 21 - 3Sept 21 - 3

Dogwood leaves and berries.

Sept 21 - 4Sept 21 - 4

A persimmon and a fly.

Sept 21 - 5Sept 21 - 5

This bumblebee was sleeping.

Sept 21 - 6Sept 21 - 6

I liked how the fence follows the rolling slopes.

Sept 21 - 7Sept 21 - 7

A monarch on goldenrod.

Sept 21 - 8Sept 21 - 8

Goldenrod dominates the landscape in the back of the sanctuary.

Sept 21 - 9Sept 21 - 9

A monarch caterpillar munches on milkweed leaves.

To raise funds for hurricane relief, please consider purchasing a butterfly print from my Wings of Hope collection.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries in Central Maryland:  Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD, and Audrey Carroll in Mt. Airy.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Volunteers are always needed to help with sanctuary management.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-first-day-of-fall Thu, 21 Sep 2017 16:22:52 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuaries: Monarch Tagging! http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-monarch-tagging <Click all photos to enlarge.
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Sept 16 - 1Sept 16 - 1 Sept 16 - 2Sept 16 - 2 What a beautiful day for the monarch tagging project at the Audrey Carroll Sanctuary near Mt. Airy!  This popular family activity was in full swing by the time we arrived.

My sister Erica and her husband Fredi, who arrived late last night from Heidelberg, Germany, for a family wedding later this afternoon, came with me on the walk.  We found the monarch tagging station and listened to the demonstration on how to capture a butterfly, and then we grabbed a net and took off.

Sept 16 - 3Sept 16 - 3 Sept 16 - 4Sept 16 - 4 We walked to the location where I always see butterflies, and sure enough, as soon as we arrived, a monarch flew right to a thistle in front of us.  I used the "under the butterfly" technique and snagged it on my second try!

Erica took possession of the net and kept the butterfly loosely protected in the netting as we walked our way back to the tagging station.  Happily, we were the first ones to arrive with a monarch, and a large group of kids and adults watched as the butterfly was tagged.

Sept 16 - 5Sept 16 - 5 Sept 16 - 6Sept 16 - 6 Carol, the butterfly lady in charge, removed the monarch from the net.  She identified its sex (male) and showed us the little sticker.  It has a strong, waterproof adhesive.  She applied the sticker to the "mitten" shape on the monarch's wings, and recorded the data, including sticker number, date, "wild or raised," and sex.  She placed the butterfly in my sister's palm, where it rested for a moment and then flew free.

Later, hopefully in Mexico, the sticker on this butterfly will be read and recorded, indicating that this tagged monarch made it safely on its trip there.  The data is used to help study the migration paths of these beautiful butterflies.

Sept 16 - 7Sept 16 - 7 All it all, it was a great morning, and we're so glad we went!

To raise funds for hurricane relief, please consider purchasing a butterfly print from my Wings of Hope collection.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries in Central Maryland:  Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD, and Audrey Carroll in Mt. Airy.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Volunteers are always needed to help with sanctuary management.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-monarch-tagging Sat, 16 Sep 2017 15:11:12 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuaries: The Irma Story http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuary-the-irma-story <Click all photos to enlarge.
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Sept 10 - 1Red Admiral Today I visited the Fred Archibald Sanctuary for the first time in a while, and although I did not go intending to photograph butterflies, I was pleased to find a Red Admiral feeding on some goldenrod.  It reminded me of one of my favorite encounters from July of 2013, back when I was in my year of daily photo walking.  It certainly bears repeating today, because it is a story of hope and faith.

Sept 10 - 2Sept 10 - 2 On that particular day, I was visiting the National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Emmitsburg, and inside the bascilica I met Sister Pat, from Michigan.  She was a docent that day, and we got to talking. 

I mentioned photographing butterflies, and she launched into the most amazing story about her friend Irma, who had recently died at age 60 from cancer.  Irma was sure she was going to heaven, and before she died, she told Sister Pat that she would come back after her death and visit her as a butterfly. 

Sept 10 - 3Sept 10 - 3 After Irma's death, Sister Pat came out of mass one day to find that there was a butterfly on her car.  She took pictures of it, and it flew to the handicapped parking sign, then returned to land on her chest.  Sister Pat talked to the butterfly, addressing her as Irma.  When she opened the door to her car, the butterfly flew inside. 

Sept 10 - 4Sept 10 - 4 Sister Pat drove to Irma's house to show Irma's husband the butterfly.  Butterfly Irma stayed inside the car, posing on the windows so that Sister Pat could take pictures.  Later, Sister Pat let the butterfly go free.  Sister Pat looked in a butterfly identification book and found that the butterfly was a Red Admiral.  When telling her chiropractor about this incident, he wrote down the name and then scrambled the letters.  He found "Irma Ladder" within the scramble.  Sister Pat believes that this butterfly was Irma's ladder to heaven.

Now I have to tell you, I am not a Catholic, nor am I a regular churchgoer, but it is stories like this that confirm my belief that there is a higher power, and that one only needs to look as far as nature for evidence.  

To raise funds for hurricane relief, please consider purchasing a butterfly print from my Wings of Hope collection.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries in Central Maryland:  Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD, and Audrey Carroll in Mt. Airy.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Volunteers are always needed to help with sanctuary management.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuary-the-irma-story Sun, 10 Sep 2017 16:42:53 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuaries: Butterfly Walk http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-butterfly-walk <Click all photos to enlarge.
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Monarch Dun Skipper What a wonderful butterfly walk we had this morning at the Audrey Carroll Sanctuary!  The weather was perfect, and the butterflies were plentiful.  A dozen people showed up, most of whom are Facebook friends or camera club members (many are both), and we had a great time spotting the various kinds.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Female common yellowthroat We began along the trail on the left side of the sanctuary.  If you go, walk left at the parking area, and follow the path until you come to the first path on your left.  Follow it past the house and the fenced in garden, and walk straight ahead to to the nesting boxes you can see in the distance.  Around 10 am, all of that area is in bright sunshine, which is when the butterflies are most active.

Some of the group in the distance. Summer Azure Today we saw variegated fritillary, great spangled fritillary, eastern tiger swallowtail, black swallowtail, orange sulphur, checkered white, summer azure, painted lady, monarch, and numerous little skippers.  I was thrilled to see the painted lady, but it stayed well in the distance or behind flowers.

In addition to the butterflies, we saw goldfinches, flycatchers, common yellowthroats, and hummingbird moths.  We walked some areas twice over, and then went to the higher ground, where we found a welcome breeze.

Variegated Fritillary Great Spangled Fritillary If you have been reading my blog entries all along, you will note that I have expanded my project to include both Fred Archibald and the Audrey Carroll sanctuaries.  Each has different terrain, and each is a great place to walk, see birds, and enjoy nature.  The sanctuaries are always in need of volunteers to help maintain them, so please check out the links below to see how you can help.  

To raise funds for Hurricane Harvey relief, please consider purchasing a butterfly print from my Wings of Hope collection.

Happy Labor Day, everyone.  Keep an eye out for school children and buses, and obey those speed limits in school zones.  School starts tomorrow!

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Audubon Sanctuaries of Central Maryland, which include Fred Archibald and Audrey Carroll.  To learn about volunteering, click here.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/9/the-audubon-sanctuaries-butterfly-walk Mon, 04 Sep 2017 17:06:15 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: Photography in the Rain http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-photography-in-the-rain <Click all photos to enlarge.
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August 29 - 2This bumblebee waits out the rain under cover of the thistle. The butterfly walk I had planned for this morning was rained out, but I went to the sanctuary anyway, not only to see if anyone was intrepid enough to show up in the rain, but also to find out the answer to my question:  Do butterflies fly in the rain?  It turns out I could have Googled that answer (it is no, because their wings are too heavy from being wet), but I wanted to see for myself.  After all, birds fly in the rain, so what about butterflies?  

Although the main attraction at the sanctuary for the butterflies, the purple thistle, was loving the rain, the butterflies were not.  I found one lone bumblebee that appeared to be asleep at the base of a thistle bloom.  

August 29 - 3August 29 - 3 I thought I would give you some tips for photographing in the rain.  First, dress everything for the weather:  rain gear and rubber boots for yourself, and rain gear for your camera.  I use a waterproof cape that I made for the camera, but even a jumbo sized Ziplock bag with a hole cut for the lens will work well.  Here are some resources for camera covers at B&H. 

August 29 - 1Grasses and seeds and droplets make a pretty abstract. When using a camera cape or cover, it helps to use the lens hood.  It will provide a nice, hard surface to snug up the rain sleeve around the lens, while keeping the lens an inch or so out of the elements.  Keep a couple of microfiber cleaning cloths in your pocket and check the front of the lens often for water droplets or mist.  It is also best to use a tripod, which frees your hands for wiping down the lens, making adjustments to the camera settings through the plastic or under the cape, and enabling you to use slower shutter speeds in low light conditions.  When shooting in the rain, you will probably need a higher ISO.  Check the histogram and adjust your settings so that your shots are not underexposed.

If your backpack does not have a built in rain jacket, you can use a plastic trash bag to cover the bag while you're wearing it.  Shake it off, lay it on the ground, and you have a place to set your camera bag down for a minute while you get out your gear.  Pack some dry clothing in your car so that when you are done shooting, you can strip off the wet stuff and change into something dry; there's no sense in soaking the seats of your car for the drive home.

IncomingIncomingOne of my favorite rain shots, at Antietam. Some of my favorite photos were taken in the rain, so don't let gentle rains and showers spoil your camera outing.  However, in downpours, high winds, and thunderstorms/hurricanes, use common sense and don't take unnecessary risks.  Have fun with your photography, no matter the weather!

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

http://www.centralmdaudubon.org/faasmap.htm

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-photography-in-the-rain Tue, 29 Aug 2017 17:12:23 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: Butterfly Bonanza! http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-butterfly-bonanza <Click all photos to enlarge.
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August 27 - 4King of the thistle August 27 - 2Can we share? It's definitely butterfly time at the local Audubon sanctuaries.  Frederick County is lucky enough to have two:  the Fred Archibald sanctuary in New Market, and the Audrey Carroll sanctuary near Mt. Airy.  Both were made possible by the generous donation of farms to the Audubon Society, guaranteeing that the sanctuaries will remain undeveloped so that we and future generations may enjoy them.

August 27 - 10Quite the pair! August 27 - 14Cabbage white on ironweed. Although most people visit Audubon sanctuaries for the birds, I have been going lately for the butterflies.  I led a butterfly walk through Fred Archibald on Saturday morning, but the purple thistle favored by the butterflies was in the distance off the paths.  At Audrey Carroll, there is plenty of it right along the paths.  Today I saw butterflies of all kinds, as well as some hummingbird moths.

August 27 - 15Monarch on ironweed. August 27 - 19Definitely a flutter-er! If you want to see the butterflies, here is what to do.  Plan on getting to the sanctuary around 9:30.  Butterflies generally do not feed until the sun is up and the air is warmer.  I find they are quite active between 9:30 and 11 am.  Wear long pants (ticks are present in any area with grasses), sturdy closed-toe shoes, and a hat.  Bring along some water.

August 27 - 20Fritillary and friend August 27 - 21August 27 - 21Black swallowtail on thistle To see the butterflies, you will not need binoculars, but you may want them for the birds.  To photograph the butterflies, you will not need a long lens at this sanctuary.  A tripod may be helpful unless you are able to shoot at a high enough shutter speed to lessen the chance of blur.

August 27 - 8Yellow swallowtail on purple thistle. August 27 - 24Sip, sip, sip! Park at the roadside parking area and walk to the left of the gate.  Take the path on your left, which curves, and after the curve, take the first path on your left.  You will go by a farmhouse and a fenced in garden.  Continue on the path straight ahead to the nesting boxes, and you will see purple thistle all along the pathways.  Ironweed, ragweed, goldenrod, and Queen Anne's lace are also abundant.

August 27 - 23There were cicadas, too! Enjoy your visit to the sanctuary; please obey the posted rules and leave the pets at home.  Perhaps I will see you there at the walk I am leading Tuesday morning, August 29, at 9:30 am.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-butterfly-bonanza Sun, 27 Aug 2017 19:15:02 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: Could I Pish Up a Bird? http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-could-i-pish-up-a-bird <Click all photos to enlarge.
Hover mouse over photo for caption when viewed on a computer.>

August 21 - 1Love the pinks in this one. August 21 - 2The "balls of light" in the background are called "bokeh," which is caused by the blades in the lens when shooting "wide open." On my walk with actual birders on Saturday, one of them stopped the group along a pathway and said, "Let's see if we can 'pish up' a common yellowthroat."  Everyone got quiet while she created a sound that simulated the kind of noise we all make when imitating a leak that has suddenly sprung from a hole in a hose.  It's a spraying kind of a sound that apparently will attract birds like the common yellowthroat, who come to see who's in their neighborhood.  For those of you who doubt that this is an actual "thing," here's a website to verify it!  https://www.thespruce.com/pishing-to-attract-birds-386698

August 21 - 7Dew drop reflection August 21 - 5Common buckeye butterfly Anyway, on this beautiful, clear summer morning, the dew was hanging in droplets on the grasses and sunlight was backlighting the seed heads.  I toted both my big camera lens and a second camera with my macro lens.  Both came in handy today.

August 21 - 3Female common yellowthroat August 21 - 6Male common yellowthroat I stopped where we "pished" on Saturday, and yes, it worked.  A little couple came to check me out.  It was more successful for me today because I was alone, and not with a group, who probably make the birds more wary about approaching.  On the left is the female common yellowthroat, and on the right is the male.  They know just how to hide in the leaves, but occasionally hopped into view of my lens.

August 21 - 4Eastern pondhawk dragonfly As I was leaving the sanctuary, a gorgeous green dragonfly landed in front of me on the grass near my feet.  I have seen turquoise and black and brown dragonflies, but not this beautiful green.  It is an Eastern Pondhawk, which I will add to my "collection" of dragonflies.

August 21 - 8Partridge pea is one of the wildflowers in bloom right now. Three women were entering the sanctuary as I was leaving.  All three are sisters -- one from Florida, one from near Gettysburg, and one from Carroll County. They said the sanctuary it is listed the "Fit, Fun, and Over Fifty" meetup site, which sounds like something to check out for new adventures.  I gave them some tips about what to look for, and off they went.

Happy eclipse day, everyone.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-could-i-pish-up-a-bird Mon, 21 Aug 2017 16:24:07 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: A Group Walk http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-a-group-walk <Click all photos to enlarge.
Hover mouse over photo for caption when viewed on a computer.>

August 19 - 7Birders and their scopes. August 19 - 1Put a needle on that vinyl record, and see what it plays! On the third Saturday of each month, the Audubon Society of Central Maryland sponsors a nature walk at one of its sanctuaries.  During an "even" month, like August (the 8th month), the walk is at Fred Archibald.  On the "odd" months, like September (the 9th month), the walk will be at Audrey Carroll.  Today I joined the walk at Fred Archibald, which began at 9 am.  It was billed as the "Summer Wildlife Walk," knowing that this is not a time to see lots of birds, but there is always something to see at either of the sanctuaries, no matter the time of year.

August 19 - 2A moth suns itself August 19 - 3A cicada suns itself. Today's walk was led by Crystal, Bonnie, and Kathy, who are members of the Audubon Society and local bird clubs.  You can always tell the birders from the photographers, because they are usually wearing not only their binoculars, but carrying tripods with birding scopes attached.  The way they walk the sanctuary is different from me, because they tend to stop in one place for a much longer time, listen to bird calls, and gaze off into the far distant treetops.

Right away we saw a flock of cedar waxwings flitting about over the grasses and into the trees.  They were likely catching insects on the wing.  Of course, they stayed well out the range of my camera, but those birders with their scopes got some great views.

August 19 - 4Pearl Crescent butterfly August 19 - 5Male widow skimmer dragonfly (I think) I found dragonflies, a few butterflies, and some insects.  It was nice to walk with others, even at a very slow pace, to talk about birding locations, cameras and lenses, and trips both planned and taken.  

The next walk is at Audrey Carroll on Saturday, September 16, at 9 a.m., where the focus will be on monarch tagging.  This is one not to miss, although I will have to miss it.  Monarchs should be plentiful in the sanctuary that day, if the weather is good.  Tiny little stickers will be put on their wings, which does not impede their flight at all.  

August 19 - 6Female widow skimmer dragonfly (I think) Here is a link to future walks at the sanctuaries:  Nature Walks.  Thanks, everyone, for coming out to the sanctuary today.  It was nice to see new faces!

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-a-group-walk Sat, 19 Aug 2017 18:00:21 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: A Wet and Webby Morning http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-a-wet-and-webby-morning <Click all photos to enlarge.
Hover mouse over photo for caption when viewed on a computer.>

August 16 - 1Water was like jewels on this plant. August 16 - 2The grasses are putting out seeds. I can't believe it's been eleven days since I last walked the sanctuary.  Between taking kids to and from camps, being out of town for four days, and the rain we have had, I was glad to get back to do a walk there.  I was pleased to see that some of the pathways had recently been mowed.  Volunteers do this work, and if you like mowing, contact the sanctuary management, and I'm sure your help will be welcomed!  

August 16 - 4Beads of water edged every blade of grass this morning. August 16 - 6Ladybug on grass This morning I knew the walk would be wet, so I took my long walking stick to wave in front of me on some of the wooded paths, so that I would not end up draped in web filaments.  Grasses were beaded up with dew and soon both my boots and pants were soaked.  I invested in an expensive pair of waterproof shoes that are not waterproof at all, so I am very disappointed in them.  I will purchase a spray for them to see if it helps.

August 16 - 3Fall webworms August 16 - 5More webworms Fall webworms are quite visible in the trees now, along roadsides as well as in the sanctuary.  Often confused with tent caterpillars, fall webworms form their webs in late summer on the ends of branches.  The webs are full of small brown, hairy caterpillars.  Tent caterpillars are seen in the spring and they are black with a white or gold stripe.

August 16 - 7Delicate grasses with tiny water beads The goldenrod is getting ready to burst into bloom, and in a couple of weeks, masses of yellow will fill the sanctuary.  Monarchs will be plentiful, feeding on the nectar to fill up their energy stores before heading to Mexico.  I'll let you know when it's time to see the monarchs.  We can walk there together!  Maybe my shoes will truly be waterproof by then.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-a-wet-and-webby-morning Wed, 16 Aug 2017 16:07:47 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: Birds Galore! http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-birds-galore <Click all photos to enlarge.
Hover mouse over photo for caption when viewed on a computer.>

August 5 - 3Female common yellowthroat August 5 - 4Widowskimmer dragonfly It seems that whenever I go to the sanctuary, I see far more insects than birds.  Today I toted my big lens, hoping to photograph some birds.  They were out enjoying this beautiful cool, breezy morning as much as I was, but they made sure to stay far away.  I saw and/or heard a blue jay, bluebirds, robins, sparrows of all sorts, mourning doves, tree swallows, a cardinal, and common yellowthroats.  I even saw a murmuration of starlings swirling far in the distance.  Alas, only a female yellowthroat posed for my lens, but I was happy to find her.

August 5 - 1Pink grasses Fall is coming soon to the sanctuary.  The grasses are waving their seeds around.  I loved the reddish pink ones that glowed in the sunlight and danced in the breeze.  Milkweed plants are busy generating their fluffy seeds inside their still-green prickly pods.  Caterpillars are emerging, and soon will be forming their chrysalises before transforming into something with wings.  After Googling the one I found in the photo, I learned it is the Danaus plexippus, and it will become a monarch butterfly! August 5 - 6Danaus plexippus: This one will be a monarch butterfly!

August 5 - 5Virginia creeper August 5 - 2Like a vinyl record! Upon leaving the sanctuary, I found a sunlight sapling with Virginia creeper climbing up its trunk, as well as a well-spun spiderweb woven between branches.  Be careful if you walk in any of the wooded areas, so as not to end up with a face full of spider web, and perhaps even its denizen, stranded into your hair.

I found my friend Mary, another photography enthusiast, standing by my car as I was leaving.  I wish I had had the time to walk it again with her, but my day ahead is filled with jobs to be done.  She was wearing sandals, so we both agreed she needed sturdy footwear, which luckily she had in her car.  The grasses are getting tall, and they are usually wet.  I directed her to the last blooming milkweed in the sanctuary, where she is likely to find a monarch.

Tomorrow should be just as nice as today.  I hope you visit the sanctuary -- please sign in at the little pavilion, and that way, I will know you were there!

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-birds-galore Sat, 05 Aug 2017 15:58:25 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: Monarch Morning! http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-monarch-morning <Click all photos to enlarge.
Hover mouse over photo for caption when viewed on a computer.>

August 2 - 1Monarch on milkweed August 2 - 2Three and more! Around 10 am is feeding time for the monarchs; the sun has warmed up the flowers, the nectar is flowing, and the butterflies are flocking to the only milkweed left in bloom at the sanctuary.  All other milkweed has gone to seed, but there are a few flowers along the horse farm fence line.  If you go in the next couple of mornings, park at the sanctuary gate, and step over the rail on either side.  Walk down the hill to the pavilion, and take the path to the right, up to the horse farm.  Turn left at the fence, and the milkweed is on the left, between the second the third nesting boxes.

August 2 - 3Another beauty. August 2 - 8Groundhog from a distance. Upon leaving the butterflies, I walked a different part of the sanctuary this morning, and on my walk I saw more butterflies, Eastern kingbirds, a black swallowtail butterfly, a rabbit, and a groundhog.  

 

August 2 - 5Photo with the DSLR August 2 - 4Photo with the pocket camera The fall webworms are busy building their tents at the ends of branches, and I came across a walnut tree branch encased in filaments.  It surrounded leaves and walnuts, and caterpillars were busy crawling around inside the webby tent.  I decided this would be a good test of a closeup with my new pocket-sized camera, so I took a shot with my DSLR zoomed in on filaments at the tip of a walnut (photo on left) and another with the pocket camera (photo on right.)  I practiced some more in the house this morning and read a few tips online about how to get sharp focus where I want it to be (and not the camera), and I had more success.

August 2 - 6Chickory flower with pocket camera in macro mode August 2 - 7A cicada I also tried the pocket camera on a chickory flower, and I was pleased with the focus and sharpness.  I used the macro setting on the camera.  Of course, I always edit my photos, so that I can bring out the best parts of each shot.  A cicada also flew to a strand of grass near me, so I used the DSLR to zoom in on it.  The photo with a pocket camera would have been too tiny.  I think walking with both kinds of cameras is going to be a good compromise for me.

In the next few weeks, the goldenrod and ragweed will be in bloom, attracting even more monarchs.  I enjoy watching how the change of seasons affects what lives in and depends on the sanctuary to sustain life.

 

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/8/the-audubon-sanctuary-monarch-morning Wed, 02 Aug 2017 17:10:31 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: Audrey Carroll http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/7/the-audubon-sanctuary-audrey-carroll <Click all photos to enlarge.
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July 31 - 1Leaves in the morning light July 31 - 2Come into my web! Today I decided to change things up a bit and visit the Audrey Carroll Sanctuary near Mt. Airy, but still located within Frederick County.  We are fortunate to have two large sanctuaries right here in Frederick County.

This brochure has information about the sanctuary, and in particular, information about Audrey Carroll, the woman for whom the sanctuary is named. http://www.centralmdaudubon.org/faasmap.htm

As with the Fred Archibald sanctuary, there are trails and woodland and natural habitat.  Trails are mowed and between them in the open areas is an abundance of native plants and grasses, which provide cover and habitat for various kinds of birds and wildlife.  Some sparrows nest on the ground, so grassy cover is essential to keep them out of view of hawks and other predators.  I have disturbed deer on my walks that were lying in the grasses, too.

July 31 - 3A skipper surveys his domain. July 31 - 4An acmon blue butterfly I was happy to meet Mark Kulis today, with whom I have been corresponding via email.  He is the committee chair for sanctuaries at the Audubon Society of Central Maryland, and today he was doing some maintenance at Audrey Carroll.  The sanctuaries depend on volunteers for much of the maintenance at both sanctuaries (there is a lot of brush to clear, weeds to pull, and grass to mow), and another volunteer named Karen was weeding.  She told me she recently retired and has been busy with volunteer outdoor activities ever since.  I'm hoping to meet with the board of directors in September to talk about ways that this blog and my photos can assist with supporting the mission of the society and the sanctuaries in particular.

July 31 - 6Ruins of the dairy July 31 - 7Ghosts of the dairy There is an old diary milking station on the property, with ghostly figures spray-painted on the walls.  It has really become overgrown since my first visit there about three years ago.  Another difference on this sanctuary is the presence of a house (used for sanctuary business) and a pond.

If you're looking for a good place to take a walk and enjoy nature, try out one of our two Frederick County sanctuaries.  Don't be deterred by a locked gate.  Park by the gate and step over the low rail on either side of the gate.  Obey the posted rules and enjoy!

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/7/the-audubon-sanctuary-audrey-carroll Mon, 31 Jul 2017 18:32:24 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: After the Rain http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/7/the-audubon-sanctuary-after-the-rain <Click all photos to enlarge.
Hover mouse over photo for caption when viewed on a computer.>

July 29 - 1Queen of the Lace! July 29 - 2We can share. We've had quite a bit of rain, and my Brazilian houseguest Carmen just bought a new camera and lens.  We attempted to go for a walk this morning, but the light rain foiled our plans.  This afternoon when the sun came out, we headed for the sanctuary to give her new camera a "field test."  

Small butterflies were out in force, feeding on the only flowers blooming right now, which are primarily the Queen Anne's lace.  They are sharing the flower space with bees.  Carmen stopped to take photos of water droplets, insects, flowers, and of course, the butterflies.

July 29 - 3Milkweed bug family reunion. July 29 - 4Orange sulphur butterfly Someone had been through the sanctuary since my last visit a week ago, cutting down some saplings.  Managing growth is important to maintain proper habitat for wildlife and birds.

It was great to see some sunshine after all the rain.  I predict that with the sunshine predicted for the next few days, rapid growth of the native grasses will be evident along the pathways.

July 29 - 5This tree was watching me. July 29 - 6Monarch brakes for a landing! If you decide to visit the sanctuary, don't be discouraged if you see the gate closed and locked.  It is always closed and locked.  Just park near the gate, and walk to either side of it, stepping over the low pipe rail.  Then continue on down the hill and into the sanctuary.  You will see a small pavilion; be sure to sign in to let the managers know you were there.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/7/the-audubon-sanctuary-after-the-rain Sun, 30 Jul 2017 03:12:33 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: My Friend Ray http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/7/the-audubon-sanctuary-my-friend-ray <Click all photos to enlarge.
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July 23 - 1Gray hairstreak butterfly. July 23 - 2Ray focuses on something tiny. I met my friend Ray when he enrolled in one of my photography classes at FCC, accompanied by two sign language interpreters.  It was the first time I had had a deaf person in one of my classes, so I had to get used to looking at Ray when I spoke, and not at the interpreter.  When one of them said, "Did you get my email?" I looked at her and said, "No," not realizing it was really Ray who was asking me that question, so I quickly changed my answer to "Yes."  Having the interpreters in class took a little getting used to!  Ray took both my black and white photography and my flower photography classes, and we have kept in touch.

July 23 - 3The most popular plant in the sanctuary! July 23 - 4Yesterday's rain clings to the back of a leaf. Last night Ray messaged me that he would be walking the sanctuary, although he didn't mention a time.  When I arrived, I saw a parked car, but I did not see him.  I decided that the smart thing for me to do was to walk the sanctuary the opposite way I usually go, and sure enough, halfway around I found Ray.

We both were using our macro lenses.  I pulled out my pen and paper, and we were able to ask questions of each other using the pad.  Of course, pointing out butterflies, beetles, and dragonflies was easy, and we needed no words for that.

July 23 - 5Cicada shell on lichen covered tree trunk. July 23 - 8A cicada shell on the fence On our walk, we found a number of cicada shells, which I mentioned yesterday that I would have to look for.  There were also just a few milkweed plants in bloom, and they were heavily visited by bees, beetles, and butterflies.  Our macro lenses got a good workout.

July 23 - 6A skipper on milkweed. July 23 - 7Lichen grows on the top of each fence post. When we parted, I reminded Ray to check for ticks; he decided to stay a while longer.  I'm so glad we found each other this morning.  Now another friend is aware of the sanctuary, and I'm sure he'll visit it again.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/7/the-audubon-sanctuary-my-friend-ray Sun, 23 Jul 2017 15:59:46 GMT
The Audubon Sanctuary: A Chorus of Cicadas! http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/7/the-audubon-sanctuary-a-chorus-of-cicadas <Click all photos to enlarge.
Hover mouse over photo for caption when viewed on a computer.>

July 22 - 3One of the many deer trails crossing the meadows. July 22 - 1Virginia tiger moths hiding under a blade of grass. When I opened the door of my car this morning at the sanctuary, I was greeted by a cacophony of cicadas, which is one of the true sounds of summer in Maryland.  On my walk the chorus continued, with the additions of the cries of a crow, the bellowing of a bullfrog, the drumming of a woodpecker, and the warbling of a wren.  The only man-made sound was the occasional airplane or jet overhead.  Try as I might, I could not find a cicada to photograph; perhaps when they leave their dried shells on tree limbs, I will see the only physical evidence that they were inhabiting this peaceful place.

July 22 - 2Can you see me now? July 22 - 5Female common yellowthroat with breakfast. Summer heat is taking its toll on plants as flowers and grasses are drying and moving into seed production.  Dragonflies and other insects, like moths and tiny butterflies, still flit from perch to perch.  Nesting season is winding down, as fledglings try their hand at capturing their own food.

July 22 - 4Halloween pennant dragonfly July 22 - 6Black leaf-footed bug (yes, that's the name). I was pleased to photograph my first Halloween pennant dragonfly, which is so named because of the orange and brown bands of color on its wings.  The adult dragonflies eat mosquitoes, flies, and gnats.

The next time you are in the sanctuary, use your ears and listen to the sounds around you.  Perhaps you'll hear a chorus of cicadas, too.

<Thanks for reading my blog entry, which is part of a personal photography project to bring attention to and to benefit the Fred Archibald Sanctuary in New Market, MD.  The sanctuary is owned and managed by the Audubon Society of Central Maryland.  Copyright 2017 Cam Miller.  All photographs are for sale upon request.>

 

 

 

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cam.miller@comcast.net (Cam's Camera Shots) http://www.camscamerashots.com/blog/2017/7/the-audubon-sanctuary-a-chorus-of-cicadas Sat, 22 Jul 2017 15:18:32 GMT